Parents

CAP THAT! recap

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In June 2015, we launched our annual CAP THAT! campaign with a simple message: turn the captions on when watching video content in class. This year we focused on the significance of using captions to benefit even more students, including students with English as an Additional Language, those who have reading difficulties, children on the autism spectrum, as well as students who are Deaf or hearing impaired. Amongst Australian schools nationwide, this equates to over one million kids in total.

CAP THAT! captioned for learning logo


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Including captioning for excursions

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The principles of CAP THAT! don’t have to stop at the school gate. There are options for including captioning as part of an excursion; it just requires a little research and planning beforehand.

Teacher and six primary school students standing outside a building


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Parents support captions in the classroom

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Parents are a key ally in providing a supported captioning experience, according to Kate Kennedy from Parents of Deaf Children (PODC), the NSW-based parent organisation providing support, information and advocacy services to families of children with hearing loss.

Father and son sitting on a sofa using a laptop together

While the focus of the organisation is on supporting families, it often works with schools and classroom teachers to ensure they are aware of the needs of deaf children in the classroom.


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Accessible Christmas gift ideas for 2014

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Looking for that special something for that special someone—a Christmas present that is both accessible and awesome? Look no further than Media Access Australia’s guide on accessible Christmas gift ideas for 2014.

iTunes gift card

iTunes $30, $20 and $50 gift cards


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Education highlights of 2014

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This year we have further explored accessible media and resources available to support students with diverse learning needs.

Apple resting on top of books in front of a blackboard


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Interview with Kate Kennedy, winner of the Roma Wood OAM Award at the 2014 Captioning Awards

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Kate Kennedy is the Coordinator, Information and Advocacy for Parents of Deaf Children (PODC).

Kate Kennedy holding the Roma Wood OAM Community Award for captioning. Left to right: David Brady, Roma Wood, Kate Kennedy, Andrew Stewart, Alex Varley


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Finding your way around our updated education website content

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The education section of our website has a new menu structure, with an increased level of content and information to assist teachers and parents.

There are three main categories that provide focused points of reference: accessible media for diverse learners, hearing impairment and deafness and low vision and blindness.


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Teacher information (hearing)

Teachers work with a diverse range of student needs, learning styles and a curriculum that presumes the use of audiovisual/multimedia content.

It is vital that teachers who have students who are Deaf or have hearing impairment in their classrooms create an equitable educational environment through the use of inclusive teaching practices.


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Support and hearing information services for parents

There are a significant number of national and state-based organisations and websites that offer support services and information for parents, teachers and students.

National

Australian Hearing

Australian Hearing caters for people of all ages through a national network of hearing centres; including more than 110 permanently staffed centres, with 330 other locations in urban, rural and remote areas of Australia.


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Importance of a quieter classroom

Students who are Deaf or have hearing impairment have difficulty hearing speech in background noise, over distances, and through AV equipment.

All students need a sufficiently quiet environment to listen and to make any meaning from the content. The following listening skills are important:


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