Practical web accessibility

USAA’s new banking app allows voice-guided cheque depositing

no
Show on home page

USAA, a Texas-based Fortune 500 diversified financial services group, has recently demonstrated that banking and accessibility can easily go hand in hand with each other. This was proved in a recent update to their banking app which will mean that individuals who are blind or have a vision impairment will hear the benefits – literally.

USAA logo

This system offers verbal cues to guide a vision impaired customer to be able to properly position a cheque to deposit it. They use commands like ‘push out’, ‘pull in’, ‘move right’, ‘lift device’, ‘hold steady’, ‘image captured’, and more.


Top of page

Google invests in start-up that identifies images through your phone’s camera

no
Show on home page

Google has said “oui” (yes) to buying French start-up Moodstocks, a company that specialises in rapid object recognition from smartphones. This interest from Google is further proof that the world of accessibility is going mainstream.

Google logo

Google already has an object recognition app (Google Goggles), but Moodstocks operates differently. It runs on your smartphone rather than via a server, which makes it more affordable, more mainstream and more accessible to its targeted audience.


Top of page

New free technology resource for teachers of the Deaf

no
Show on home page

Australian not-for-profit, Conexu Foundation, has developed a free resource guide for teachers aimed at students who are Deaf, hard of hearing or speech impaired, entitled ‘11 easy to use technologies to enhance learning in your classroom'.

Front cover of the teacher resource with the words ‘Download Now!’

The new resource has been designed for teachers in mainstream public, Catholic and private schools where children with these disabilities attend, and allows educators to find the latest on relevant communication technology.


Top of page

Governments are toughening up on public sector web accessibility

no
Show on home page

State and Federal Governments around the globe are toughening up on public sector web accessibility. The latest case is the Alaskan Juneau School District, which felt the wrath of that state’s Government because of a complaint from the public that their websites aren’t inclusive for all needs.

close up of a man writing on some documents

After receiving the disability discrimination complaint, Alaskan authorities undertook a rigorous investigation and found out that ten other schools, educational groups, and institutions (including the Montana School for the Deaf and blind) also had accessibility issues on their websites.


Top of page

UK charity puts pressure on government to enforce web accessibility

no
Show on home page

Robin Christopherson, head of digital inclusion at Abilitynet, a UK disabilities charity, has written an open letter to the British Parliament, to put pressure on the people in power to fine organisations whose websites and apps fail to comply with WCAG 2.0.

Traffic warden issuing a parking ticket on a busy London road


Top of page

5 simple ways you can dramatically improve your blog’s accessibility

no
Show on home page

Blogging encourages freedom of personal expression so it should be a right for anyone, regardless of disabilities or requirements, to have access to this vast pool of knowledge and community.  But what simple things can you do as a blogger, or a budding blogger, to make sure that your blog is accessible?  There are 5 simple ways that you can dramatically improve your blog’s accessibility.

Woman typing on her laptop, sitting on her bed

It’s fair to say that the blogging world has boomed in recent years, with more and more people starting a blog or reading a blog on a regular basis. You only have to whisper the world ‘Zoella’ to a tween and they know exactly who they are and get all starry-eyed. 


Top of page

Call for judges – Australian Web Award 2016

no
Show on home page

Would you like to be a judge, or do you know a suitably qualified professional who would like to, for this year’s Australian Web Awards? Applications are now open if you or anyone else that you know is interested in applying.

Web professionals networking at the Australian Web Awards (courtesy of Australian Web Awards)


Top of page

Lets talk cognitive – a communication reviewer’s perspective

no
Show on home page

Media Access Australia’s Director of Digital Accessibility, Dr Scott Hollier, recently wrote The Cognitive Disability Digital Accessibility Guide. The official reviewer of this guide, from an Easy English and limited literacy skills perspective, was Naomi Rezzani, the Accessible Information Service Coordinator at Scope’s Communication & Inclusion Resource Centre. She explains the process and talks about cognitive disability in an informative podcast and article.

Front cover of the Cognitive Disability Digital Accessibility Guide


Top of page

PCWA online course aims to promote accessibility

no
Show on home page

Inclusion and accessibility are hot topics that impact on the daily lives of around 25% of the population who have a disability or impairment. And now web professionals can improve their levels of expertise in web and digital accessibility to make a positive difference by enrolling in Australia’s only university-accredited online access course.

Three students using a tablet computer

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

How the blind experience the internet

no
Show on home page

What is the internet like when you have a vision impairment? Chris Moury, who has rapidly declining vision, speaks about this topic on Control Z, a new ABC podcast by Yasmin Parry and Will Ockenden.

Laptop sitting open on a table next to a smartphone and notepad


Top of page

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Practical web accessibility