Android smartphones

Some replacement Galaxy Note7’s still too hot to handle

no
Show on home page

In September 2016 Samsung globally recalled more than 2.5 million of their flagship Galaxy Note7 smartphones due to safety concerns. Now there are growing reports of incidents of replacement models catching fire too, and production has ceased.

Two Samsung Note7 phones

Two Samsung Note7 phones

The phones, which include a lot of useful accessibility features and have been a popular choice in Australia for those people with a disability, were recalled and a replacement program put in place due to multiple cases of exploding batteries and spontaneous combustion. Yet the problems continue.

Taxonomy: 
Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

USAA’s new banking app allows voice-guided cheque depositing

no
Show on home page

USAA, a Texas-based Fortune 500 diversified financial services group, has recently demonstrated that banking and accessibility can easily go hand in hand with each other. This was proved in a recent update to their banking app which will mean that individuals who are blind or have a vision impairment will hear the benefits – literally.

USAA logo

This system offers verbal cues to guide a vision impaired customer to be able to properly position a cheque to deposit it. They use commands like ‘push out’, ‘pull in’, ‘move right’, ‘lift device’, ‘hold steady’, ‘image captured’, and more.


Top of page

Google announces Android Nougat with new accessibility features

no
Show on home page

Google has officially launched its new version of Android 7.0 Nougat which will feature a number of significant accessibility additions and improvements.

Android robot waving and standing on a pile of nougat

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

Google invests in start-up that identifies images through your phone’s camera

no
Show on home page

Google has said “oui” (yes) to buying French start-up Moodstocks, a company that specialises in rapid object recognition from smartphones. This interest from Google is further proof that the world of accessibility is going mainstream.

Google logo

Google already has an object recognition app (Google Goggles), but Moodstocks operates differently. It runs on your smartphone rather than via a server, which makes it more affordable, more mainstream and more accessible to its targeted audience.


Top of page

Curtin University receives grant to investigate the impact of mobile apps on people with a disability

no
Show on home page

An investigation by researchers at Curtin University into how mobile apps can support individuals with a disability has been awarded the 2016 Dr Louisa Alessandri Research Grant.

Someone using their smart phone maps app outside surrounded by leaves on the floor


Top of page

“Okay Google, turn on Voice Access”

no
Show on home page

As part of its focus to make Android devices more accessible to people with disabilities, Google has launched Voice Access Beta, a new accessibility service that allows Android users to control all of the functionality of their device by voice alone.

Google Voice Access Beta Logo

The new app allows users to change settings, writing texts, scrolling to the end of a page, using the camera, contacts and more.  This will allow a greater inclusion to users unable to operate the touchscreen due to a disability.


Top of page

Uber's new accessibility features create job opportunities for Deaf and hearing impaired drivers

no
Show on home page

Uber has recently improved its app’s accessibility for drivers who are Deaf or hearing impaired, removing communication barriers so that they can have an equal opportunity to become an Uber driver.

A man holding a phone with the Uber app displayed, standing in view of a busy road

What is Uber?

Uber is an online transportation network that allows consumers with smartphones to submit a trip request which is then routed to Uber drivers who use their own cars.


Top of page

Twitter supports alternative text for images sent via app

no
Show on home page

Twitter has announced that images tweeted from its iOS and Android apps can now include alternative text, ensuring that users of assistive technologies such as screen readers can understand the nature of the visual content.

Two screen shots of the composer for Twitter on iOS. The first showing the new "Add description" button overlayed on an image thumbnail in the composer, and the second showing the composition of alt text for an image. Image credit: Twitter


Top of page

Blind Citizens Australia wraps up successful convention in Perth

no
Show on home page

The Blind Citizens Australia (BCA) annual convention was held over the weekend at the Mercure hotel in Perth, with approximately 120 attendees discussing a range of issues.

Much of the focus related to the 40th anniversary of BCA with presentations and discussions relating to how products and services for people who are blind or vision impaired have progressed over that time, current issues both locally and internationally, and the significance of BCA in the future.


Top of page

Transport for NSW releases app to help the blind navigate

no
Show on home page

Transport for NSW (TfNSW) has announced the release of an app, Stop Announcer, which will help blind or vision impaired people to find their way around the public transport system across NSW.

Stop Announcer (NSW) app icon


Top of page

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Android smartphones