Australian policy and legislation

Q&A: Australia’s Media Accessibility in a Multicultural, Multilingual Context—Australia as a Case Study

no
Show on home page

Media Access Australia spoke to Professor Peter Hutchings, Dean of the School of Humanities and Communication Arts at the University of Western Sydney about media accessibility in Australia; in particular, looking at how multiculturalism and multilingualism affect people’s access to media—a topic on which Professor Hutching recently presented on at the 2014 Languages & The Media conference in Berlin.

Professor Peter Hutchings using a MacBook


Top of page

Access 2020 predicting the future – five experts, 20 ideas

no
Show on home page

A highlight of the recent the Languages and the Media Conference in Berlin was a panel presentation speculating about what access might look like in the year 2020.

Media Access Australia CEO Alex Varley presenting at the Languages & The Media Conference 2014. Credit: ICWE GmbH / Mark Bollhorst

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

Caption quality: International approaches to standards and measurement

Media Access Australia has released a white paper entitled Caption quality: International approaches to standards and measurement. It focuses on issues surrounding the live captioning of TV programs, the difficulties in measuring caption quality effectively, and some of the solutions that have been proposed.

The white paper, which is the first in a planned series, was written by our Project manager for television, Chris Mikul, and sponsored by Red Bee Media Australia.


Top of page

Consumers condemn proposed changes to captioning regulations

no
Show on home page

Consumer groups have condemned the Federal Government’s proposals to change the rules governing captioning which were introduced in Parliament last week as part of its Repeal Red Tape campaign.

Scissors cutting through red tape


Top of page

Nine’s captioners audited for quality

no
Show on home page

Ai-Media, the caption supplier for the Nine Network, has released the results of its first external caption quality audit, scoring more than 99% accuracy.

Measuring caption quality is an emerging field, with many different systems being tried around the world. Ai-Media’s audit was scored using the NER (Number, Edition error and Recognition error) system developed by Pablo Romero-Fresco and Juan Martinez. This model recognises that different kinds of errors have different impacts and therefore the quality measure should take this into account.


Top of page

Australia urged to ease copyright restrictions on accessible books

no
Show on home page

On  World Book Day, the Australian Government has been called on to ease the copyright restrictions which reduce the number of books that are available to blind, vision impaired and print disabled readers.

Around the world copyright law, which protects the rights of authors, has inadvertently worked to restrict the number of publications which can be reproduced in braille and other alternative formats. The World Blind Union estimates that just 1-7% of all books published are made available to blind readers.


Top of page

Results of our survey on multichannel captioning

no
Show on home page

A survey conducted by Media Access Australia has found that levels of captioning on commercial multichannels, which include 7Two, Go! and One, remain below 50 per cent.

The survey looked at programs screened between 6am and midnight from 5 to 11 April 2014. During that period, the highest captioning percentage recorded on a commercial multichannel was 57 per cent on the Nine network’s Gem, while the lowest was 23 per cent on the Ten network’s One.

By contrast, captioning on the ABC’s three multichannel’s, ABC News 24, ABC2 and ABC3, stood at between 96 and 100 per cent.


Top of page

ACMA grants subscription TV caption exemptions

no
Show on home page

The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has granted caption exemptions to three subscription TV suppliers, Telstra Pay TV, Optus Vision Media and Fetch TV. 

Under theBroadcasting Services Act, the ACMA has the power to grant exemption or target reduction orders to television services if providing captions for them would cause ‘unjustifiable hardship’.


Top of page

Measuring caption quality: our white paper

no
Show on home page

Media Access Australia today released a white paper entitled Caption quality: International approaches to standards and measurement. It focuses on issues surrounding the live captioning of TV programs, the difficulties in measuring caption quality effectively, and some of the solutions that have been proposed. 

The white paper, which is the first in a planned series, was written by our Project manager for television, Chris Mikul, and sponsored by Red Bee Media Australia.


Top of page

ACMA given more discretion to investigate complaints

no
Show on home page

The Australian Media and Communications Authority (ACMA) is to be given greater discretion about whether to investigate complaints under the Broadcasting Services Act, including complaints related to television captioning. 

The change is one of the Federal Government’s ‘Repeal Day’ package of reforms to cut red tape which were announced yesterday. A spokesperson for the ACMA said, “This amendment will allow the ACMA to take no action on complaints that are, for example, misconceived, trivial, stale or inappropriately divert the ACMA’s resources and the resources of broadcasters.”


Top of page

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Australian policy and legislation