Open captions

Live captioning bonanza captured by ACMA

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The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) held a day-long event in September dedicated to live captioning issues as part of its Citizen Conversation Series.

Alex Varley, Chief Executive Officer, Media Access Australia presenting at the ACMA Citizen Conversation on live captioning. Image credit: Highlights from ‘Live captioning: let’s talk’, part of the Citizen Conversation series


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The future of live captioning

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Will machines take over the captioning world and automatically provide perfect captions on live programs, events, meetings and the classroom? Or are future changes going to be more subtle than that?

Woman using a virtual reality headset


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Britain’s first Captioning Awareness Week

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Stagetext, a charitable organisation that provides captioning for theatrical performances, art galleries, museums and other arts venues, is holding a Captioning Awareness Week from 9 to 15 November 2015.

Live stage performance with a text overlay reading '[#CAPaware] because 10 million people in the UK have hearing loss'. Image credit: Stagetext


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CAP THAT! recap

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In June 2015, we launched our annual CAP THAT! campaign with a simple message: turn the captions on when watching video content in class. This year we focused on the significance of using captions to benefit even more students, including students with English as an Additional Language, those who have reading difficulties, children on the autism spectrum, as well as students who are Deaf or hearing impaired. Amongst Australian schools nationwide, this equates to over one million kids in total.

CAP THAT! captioned for learning logo


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Several hundred million reasons captions boost literacy

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The use of captions to help with literacy is supported by a range of studies and approaches. As we approach National Literacy and Numeracy Week and the culmination of the CAP THAT! campaign, we contrast two studies on captions and literacy—a small-scale American study and a massive program in India targeting hundreds of millions.

Key attached to keychain with the word 'literacy'


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Including captioning for excursions

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The principles of CAP THAT! don’t have to stop at the school gate. There are options for including captioning as part of an excursion; it just requires a little research and planning beforehand.

Teacher and six primary school students standing outside a building


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How does captioning help with inclusive education?

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Inclusive education is an expectation for any student enrolled in a mainstream school, which is the case for the vast majority of Australian school students who have a disability.

Teacher and four primary school students using a laptop


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Making access work in the New World

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Access to media through audio description and captioning is well established through most of Europe, North America and the English-speaking world. However, the situation in other parts of the globe is very mixed. Reporting in Australia is, not suprisingly, biased towards English language developments and advances. What is happening in other parts of the world, especially in Asia?

Globe of the world with Asia in focus

Digital media and technology: 

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U.S. Government makes captions compulsory in airports

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The Department of Transport has issued a ruling which will make it compulsory to turn on captions on all televisions and audio-visual displays in American airports.

People walking through an airport


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Irish cinemas show accessible movies

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Ireland’s largest cinema chain, the family-owned Omniplex, which owns 22 cinemas across the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, will start screening open-captioned movies on Monday evenings. The chain is also running captioned and autism-friendly screenings on weekend mornings.

Four people seated in a cinema with popcorn and drinks in hand


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