Open captions

Captioned video and transcripts – ideal access and teaching combination

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For students with diverse learning needs, the use of captioned content in the classroom is the best way to gain access to context and information for learning experiences using media. When captions are not available, the fall-back position for teachers has often been the use of transcripts.

Student writing the word 'plant' on an interactive whiteboard, alongside the words Irrigation, gardener, farmer, water, soil and fertilising. The caption reads 'will consolidate your message.'


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Captioning helps ASD students

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One of the identified audiences for Media Access Australia’s CAP THAT! campaign is students with diverse learning needs. This includes students who have an Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD), which represents about 0.5% of Australians according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics SDAC Survey1.

Ai-Media live captioner


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Captions aid literacy in the classroom

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Worldwide studies have identified that captions can play a vital role in improving literacy levels of students. Improving reading skills is one of the main objectives for Media Access Australia’s CAP THAT! campaign, which targets all schools and all classrooms across Australia with the simple message: turn the captions on when playing television or video content in the classroom.

High school aged girl writing on paper in classroom with other students


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Access All Areas Film Festival announces 2013 feature program

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Now in its sixth year, the free Access All Areas Film Festival celebrates how the joy of cinema can be opened up to everyone regardless of disability. The festival takes movies with open captions and audio description on the road throughout Australia.

The annual film festival is divided into three sections: the cinema tour, schools tour and community tour. Program details for the schools and community tours will be announced shortly but will include ten short, family friendly films.


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New access system hits Spanish cinemas

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A number of Spanish cinemas are introducing captioned and audio described movies across their screens using Acce-Play, an accessible cinema system developed by Spain’s Navarre de Cinema and the University of Deusto in Bilbao. The technology will allow for more flexibility with the display of captions.

Using the Acce-Play system, captions can either be open or closed, depending on the cinema’s preference.  The open captions can be projected onto a 50 centimetre wide, 5 metre long screen under the main cinema screen. Closed captions can be shown either on a small personal screen attached to the viewer’s seat or shown on a set of interactive glasses.

Audio description, an extra audio track for blind and vision impaired viewers, is sent to wireless headphones as usual.


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Open captions for movies – the real story

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Accessible cinema, which offers movies with captions for the Deaf and hearing impaired and audio description for the blind and vision impaired, is a much-debated topic worldwide as cinemas move from analogue to digital systems. The one constant in the debates is the issue of open captions.

The move to digital cinema is a major change to the industry across the world.  The delivery methods for movies are changing frequently and cinemas and film distributors are still coming to terms with accessing movie files in different formats. This all means that it is a very fluid situation and this is having a direct impact on access issues including the options available to show captions in an open format.


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