AHRC, Australian Human Rights Commission

Policy and expectations

By the end of 2014 the major cinema chains of Hoyts, Village, Event, and Reading cinemas had rolled out around 240 accessible screens across 130 cinemas around the country. This was part of the Commonwealth Government’s Cinema Access Implementation Plan  that saw every major chain cinema complex in the country have accessibility services on at least one screen per venue.


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Employment discrimination inquiry highlights value of digital accessibility

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The role of digital accessibility in helping reduce discrimination against older Australians and those with a disability—while helping create value for employers—has been recognised at the launch of a new inquiry.

Elderly woman and man in office attire


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Vision Australia launches audio description campaign

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Vision Australia has launched Tell the Whole Story, a campaign calling for the introduction of audio description on television. The campaign asks that people write to the Minister of Communications, Malcolm Turnbull, to express their need for the service.

Left hand holding a remote control, pointed at a TV screen


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Vision Australia lodges audio description complaints against broadcasters

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Vision Australia has lodged complaints against the Seven, Nine and Ten networks, SBS and Foxtel with the Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC), calling on them to provide an audio description service for the blind and vision impaired.

Microphone in front of an audio mixing console. Image credit: marvinjvds via Flickr


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Q&A Gilbert + Tobin’s Darren Fittler

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Media Access Australia spoke with Gilbert + Tobin’s Darren Fittler about his nomination for the 2014 Australian Human Rights Commission’s Human Rights Awards, challenges in media access, and his 40 by 40 challenge.

Portrait of Darren Fittler


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Human Rights Commission releases disability survey results

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The Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) has released the results of a survey it undertook in the lead-up to the National Disability Forum which took place on 15 September.

The online survey, which was conducted over two weeks, aimed to identify the most important human rights issues facing persons with disabilities, the priorities for improving their employment outcomes, and the most strategic ways to focus the resources of the AHRC on these issues. For each question, respondents were asked to pick three out of 10 to 16 options. A total of 541 respondents took part in the survey.


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How to improve media access: complain

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People with disabilities have been urged to make formal complaints to the Australian Human Rights Commission in order to encourage governments to make positive changes to policy.

Speaking at the National Disability Forum 2014, President of the Australian Human Rights Commission, Emeritus Professor Gillian Triggs, said the complaints process was one of the most effective ways to help the commission advocate on behalf of people with disabilities.


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Australian accessible apps developers to be honoured

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The shortlist for the inaugural competition to recognise the work of Australian accessible app developers, the Apps For All Challenge 2014, has been announced.

The challenge, announced earlier this year, is being run by the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN) and the Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC), and is sponsored by Telstra.

For the category of 'Most accessible mainstream app', the finalists are: Energy Rating, ACCC Shopper and My Bus (Canberra Transport).


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Graeme Innes’s greatest media access hits

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With Graeme Innes finishing up in his role as Disability Discrimination Commissioner today, Media Access Australia takes the opportunity to look back at some of his greatest achievements in improving access to media for people with disabilities.

Innes, who has been blind since birth, completed a law degree in 1977. He was a hearing commissioner with the then Human Rights and Equal Opportunities Commission from 1994 to 2001, Deputy Disability Discrimination Commissioner from 1999 to 2005, and has been Disability Discrimination Commissioner since 2005. He contributed to the drafting of the United Nations’ ‘Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities’, and was an advisor during the development of the National Disability Strategy.


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Is access to the internet a human right?

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The Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) held a public talk on Thursday which explored the issue of access to the internet and the web as a human right. Among the speakers was our deputy CEO Natalie Collins, who spoke on how people with disability rely on the internet.

The Rights Talk was well attended with approximately 50-60 people filling the room at the AHRC offices. Disability Discrimination Commissioner Graeme Innes chaired the event and began by introducing the concept of human rights and how the internet and access to it is integral for society.

He asked Collins and other panel members if they perceived internet access as a human right.


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