ACMA, Australian Communications and Media Authority

Mobile device usage surges in Australia

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The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has released new research showing the growing use of tablet computers which, in turn, emphasises the need for improved mobile device accessibility.

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Government proposes to end caption reporting by free-to-air broadcasters

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A bill was today introduced into the House of Representatives by the Minister for Communications, Malcolm Turnbull, which would remove the requirement that free-to-air broadcasters need to report annually on their compliance with captioning targets.

Parliament House, Canberra


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Repealing captioning red tape: Captioning of repeats on multichannels

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In the fifth part of our series on red tape repeal, we look at the digital multichannels, which are currently exempt from the normal caption quotas but are required to caption previous repeats.

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Repealing captioning red tape: Caption reporting

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In the third part of our series on red tape repeal, we look at calls to end the requirement that broadcasters must report on how much captioning they have done.

Scissors cutting through red tape


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Repealing captioning red tape: Caption quotas on subscription TV

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In the second part of our series on red tape repeal, we look at the issue of caption quotas on subscription television, and the importance for consumers of knowing in advance how much will be captioned on individual channels.

Open scissors cutting through red tape


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ACMA finds Nine cricket coverage breached caption quality rules

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The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has found that segments of Channel Nine Cricket broadcast in January 2014 breached its caption quality standard.

The ACMA’s standard, which came into effect in July 2013, states that captions must be readable, accurate and comprehensible. The breaches related to the pre-game segments of programs which went to air on 12 and 17 January.


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Caption reports hide great access story

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Why is it that our communications regulator seems satisfied to hide great achievements in access by our free-to-air television stations? Commentary by Alex Varley.

Developments that benefit viewers, stations, advertisers and content providers should be celebrated and publicised. Instead the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) puts out reports that hide innovation and the power of the market to deliver more under a spirit of healthy competition.


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ACMA finds Prime and GTV9 breached caption regulations

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The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has found that Prime Television failed to meet its captioning obligations by broadcasting a section of the 2013 My Kitchen Rules Grand Final without captions, while GTV9 was also in breach for not captioning segments of its Evening News.

Under the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 (BSA), television license holders must provide captioning for all programs broadcast on primary channels between 6 pm and 10.30 pm, and these captions must meet standards determined by the ACMA relating to readability, comprehensibility and accuracy.


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US regulator dismisses captioning exemption petitions

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The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has dismissed petitions from 16 television programs requesting exemptions from closed captioning requirements because they would be “economically burdensome”.

According to the notice issued by the FCC on 2 June 2014, after representatives of the programs lodged initial petitions for exemptions, they were asked to provide further information. As they had failed to do this to the FCC’s satisfaction, it dismissed the petitions, which means that the programs have 90 days to meet captioning requirements. The programs include Zomboo’s House of Horror Movies, The Norm Prouty Real Estate Show and several religious programs.


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ACMA grants subscription TV caption exemptions

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The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has granted caption exemptions to three subscription TV suppliers, Telstra Pay TV, Optus Vision Media and Fetch TV. 

Under theBroadcasting Services Act, the ACMA has the power to grant exemption or target reduction orders to television services if providing captions for them would cause ‘unjustifiable hardship’.


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