ATAG

Five tips to make the web work better in your language

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In late May, Dr Scott Hollier travelled to Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, to teach a web accessibility course to 22 students. As part of the assignment work, the students learnt how to use the basic functionality of screen readers and other Assistive Technology (AT). While the work went well, it quickly became apparent that there were a number of issues relating to the way in which Arabic was supported by the tools, and how those tools interacted with the web.

Translate button on a keyboard amidst keys labelled with multiple languages

There are several reasons why the web becomes more complicated for non-English speaking users, and it’s a combination of a number of factors:


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Q&A with Robert Osztolykan, creator of the petition to make Steam accessible

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Media Access Australia spoke with Robert Osztolykan, blind gamer and creator of the petition to make Valve’s gaming platform Steam accessible to people who are blind or vision impaired. Robert shares his motivation to start the petition, his experiences playing mainstream titles, his thoughts on the current generation of gaming and why developers need to consider accessibility.

Steam controller. Image credit: Pierre Lecourt via Flickr

Steam is highly popular, featuring more than five million users. Part of this popularity is that it features more than 3,500 free and paid-for games that users of Windows, Mac and Linux computers can browse and download to play.


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Simplifying the web accessibility message – reflections on CSUN 2012

A few weeks ago, I was very fortunate to have the opportunity to travel to San Diego for the CSUN 27th Annual International Technology and Persons with Disabilities Conference, commonly known as CSUN 2012. 

Digital media and technology: 

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The inner workings of WAI: an interview with Shadi Abou-Zahra

To kick off the new year, it is an absolute pleasure and privilege to present this interview with Shadi Abou-Zahra, a person who is uniquely placed to provide a personal insight into the inner workings of the W3C’s Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI). For those who may not have heard of Shadi, he is based in Vienna, Austria and is extremely dedicated to supporting the online access needs of people with disabilities through his work in WAI.

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W3C updates accessibility guidelines

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The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the global regulatory body for the web, has recently updated a number of their working draft standards. A series of documents within its Web Accessibility Initiative have been progressed, with updates to the Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) 2.0, User Agent Accessibility Guidelines (UAAG) and draft documents released by the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 Evaluation Taskforce (Eval TF).

The ATAG Working Group has published updated Working Drafts of ATAG 2.0 and the companion document Implementing ATAG 2.0 which define how authoring tools can help developers produce accessible web content that conforms to WCAG 2.0. It also defines how to make authoring tools accessible to people with disabilities.

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