Cinema

Accessible movies at the Melbourne International Film Festival

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The annual Melbourne International Film Festival (MIFF) will host four audio described and open captioned movies this year. The four feature-length movies will play at Hoyts Melbourne Central over the weekend of 9-11 August and patrons are invited to reserve tickets now.

Three of the movies - Galore, Patrick and These Final Hours - will be world premieres during their accessible sessions. The fourth movie is the theatrical take on Tim Winton’s award-winning short story series The Turning, which premieres earlier in the week. All movies are Australian and further information on each can be found on the MIFF website.


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CineEurope - a roving report on cinema access developments

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Europe's largest cinema convention, CineEurope, is currently taking place in Barcelona, Spain, and our cinema manager, Ally Woodford, visited the trade show to find out the latest on movie accessibility.

Woodford met with equipment and ticket booking software manufacturers. She was able to test Sony's Entertainment Access Glasses in a cinema setting and see USL's caption viewing options of glasses and personal seat-mount screen. USL is the only company currently offering both technologies.


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Celebrities audio describe London

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UK audio description specialist Vocal Eyes has completed an inspiring series titled London Beyond Sight, securing the voice talents of 40 famous Londoners to describe significant landmarks and buildings. The project originated from a similar idea in New York.

Executive Director of Vocal Eyes, Judy Dixey, explained in The Guardian that the celebrities were given assistance from audio description professionals, including research about the landmarks and writing the scripts.


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Captioned cinema moves forward with new technologies

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Two new accessible cinema developments in the USA and UK have movie fans getting excited about what might be the next steps in captioned movies. Both developments, InvisibleCaptions and the Off-Screen Cinema Subtitle System, present the compromise that can win over both consumers and exhibitors.

That compromise is one that allows exhibitors to screen captioned movies across a wide range of sessions where the captions are seemingly ‘open’ to those that are wearing filtering glasses, very similar to 3D glasses. The glasses do not carry projection equipment making them lightweight and less bulky than current captioned cinema eyewear such as Sony’s.


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