Cinema

Captioned cinema moves forward with new technologies

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Two new accessible cinema developments in the USA and UK have movie fans getting excited about what might be the next steps in captioned movies. Both developments, InvisibleCaptions and the Off-Screen Cinema Subtitle System, present the compromise that can win over both consumers and exhibitors.

That compromise is one that allows exhibitors to screen captioned movies across a wide range of sessions where the captions are seemingly ‘open’ to those that are wearing filtering glasses, very similar to 3D glasses. The glasses do not carry projection equipment making them lightweight and less bulky than current captioned cinema eyewear such as Sony’s.


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2013 Access Awards winners announced

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The winners of the 2013 Access Awards presented by the American Foundation for the Blind have been announced, honouring the work of organisations that help to improve access to media for people with vision loss.

Included in the list of winners are AT&T, Best Buy, Panasonic, Regal Entertainment Group and the Royal National Institute of the Blind (RNIB). Recognition was given to their products and services that showed innovation in order to cater to the needs of people with disabilities.

Winners of the 2013 Access Awards are:


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US senator introduces legislation for accessible entertainment

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The impact of access legislation in the USA has had a ripple effect around the world. The 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act, introduced in 2010, has seen a flood of captioned video reach the web. Now two bills being put forward by an Iowan senator could see progress in cinema and in-flight entertainment.

Senator Tom Harkin, who was responsible for introducing the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in 1989, has introduced the Captioning and Image Narration to Enhance Movie Accessibility (CINEMA) Act to amend Title III of the current ADA. The CINEMA Act will require cinema complexes with two or more screens to offer captioning and audio description for all movies at all sessions.


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Rear Window Captioning drops license fee

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One of the most established cinema closed caption systems, Rear Window Captioning (RWC), is going to be more cost effective for cinemas to install. Celebrating its 20th Anniversary, RWC’s developer, the National Center for Accessible Media, announced it will do away with its license fee in support of the entertainment industry.

RWC made its debut in 1997 as part of regular feature film presentations in American movie theatres, allowing people with hearing loss to attend movies and view captions on a personal screen. The device replicates the look of open captions by displaying captions on clear Perspex which is placed between the viewer and the screen.


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