Cinema

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Hoyts Kiosk improve accessibility

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Entertainment giant Hoyts has increased its number of DVD rental kiosks nationally, as well as improve the access information about the titles each kiosk holds.

Launched in 2009, Hoyts Kiosk offers new release movies to the general public via a vending machine (kiosk). Kiosks take payment via credit card and rentals can be kept for up to ten days. There is also the flexibility of reserving online through the Hoyts Kiosk website to ensure your title is available, and returning rentals to any kiosk location.


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The digital accessible cinema chain: Part 3 – exhibitors: at the coalface of accessible cinema

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In the final part of our three-part series on accessible cinema, Media Access Australia project manager Ally Woodford tackles the often-misunderstood roles and responsibilities of exhibitors.

Exhibitors are presenting an end-product around which strict licensing controls are in place in terms of how, when and where a movie is shown. Also, exhibitors have no control over whether access features of audio description and captions are included on a movie. Their control extends to whether those features, if available, are transmitted for patrons.

Exhibitors’ jurisdiction is the weekly scheduling of a movie at each location and the equipment used to bring access features to life for patrons that wish to use them.

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The digital accessible cinema chain: Part 2 – The role of distributors

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In the second part of our three-part series on accessible cinema, Media Access Australia project manager Ally Woodford looks at the role distributors play in the production of captioned and audio described movies.

Movie distributors play a central role in engaging cinema audiences in a number of ways, including the delivery of captions and audio description.

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The digital accessible cinema chain: Part 1 – The overall picture and stakeholders

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In this three-part series, Media Access Australia project manager Ally Woodford looks at the stakeholders and roles they play in making movies accessible.

The path a movie takes from its concept to delivery on screen can take many years, whether it is a Hollywood ‘blockbuster’ produced by a major movie studio or an independent movie produced on a limited budget. Filming and post-production alone may take18 months and accessibility of the end result will not be a consideration during this time.


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Captioned theatre funding program for US regional venues

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American not-for-profit organisation Theatre Development Fund (TDF) is offering two-year partnerships to regional venues to provide open captioning of performances. The partnerships introduce new audiences to captioned theatre and inspire theatre companies to continue with a caption service at the partnership’s completion.

The partnerships, developed as the National Open Captioning Initiative, are funded by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation, the MetLife Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. The funding is put directly towards the service and its promotion, as opposed to providing a cheque to the partners.


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Sydney Opera House unveils its 2014 Access Program

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One of the world’s most iconic performance spaces has launched a new program of services and initiatives to ensure people with disabilities experience the same access to arts as their family and friends. The Sydney Opera House’s 2014 Access Program will provide captioning and audio description among other services for a range of productions throughout the year.

Highlights of the program include the addition of live captioning of the digital education program via video conferencing for students and an audio description smartphone app for patrons attending performances. The Opera House is also working on captioning its past Talks and Ideas videos on its online video portal as well as future uploads.


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Audio desciption at the Adelaide Festival

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The annual Adelaide Festival, considered one of the world’s best celebrations of the arts, kicks off on 28 February with a program full of audio described events for people who are blind or vision impaired.

Five theatre performances will be audio described by newly established Adelaide access company 


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New audio description business flourishes in South Australia

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Over the last four years a team of dedicated arts access workers in South Australia have worked towards establishing Access2Arts, a disability arts organisation that includes a professional audio description service to bring the arts to life for people who are blind or vision impaired. Access2Arts is soon to complete its first year of operation with a number of successful projects under its belt.

Formed in 2009 as Arts SA’s Disability and Arts Transition Team (DATT), initial purchase of audio description receivers and broadcasters allowed DATT to branch out and offer audio description to venues and arts companies not traditionally part of the fixed venue service, then offered by the Royal Society for the Blind.


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