Cinema

Rear Window Captioning drops license fee

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One of the most established cinema closed caption systems, Rear Window Captioning (RWC), is going to be more cost effective for cinemas to install. Celebrating its 20th Anniversary, RWC’s developer, the National Center for Accessible Media, announced it will do away with its license fee in support of the entertainment industry.

RWC made its debut in 1997 as part of regular feature film presentations in American movie theatres, allowing people with hearing loss to attend movies and view captions on a personal screen. The device replicates the look of open captions by displaying captions on clear Perspex which is placed between the viewer and the screen.


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The history of cinema captioning, as told by a pioneer

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American captioning advocate and blogger Shanna Groves has posted the second interview in her series on movie accessibility for people who are Deaf or hearing impaired. In this instalment, captioning pioneer Larry Goldberg from WGBH in Boston provides a number of insights into the development of WGBH’s Rear Window Captioning system as well as the arrival on the market of competitors.

In Groves' interview with Goldberg he talks about how a range of options to watch captioned movies is a good thing, in reference to other cinema access technologies such as Sony’s Entertainment Access Glasses and CaptiView. He also hints at changes to Rear Window Captioning licensing fees which potentially could widen market opportunities for WGBH.


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The top 5 ways the Disability Discrimination Act has boosted access

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The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) turns 20 this year and Australia’s disability communities are taking the opportunity to reflect on how the Act has been used as an instrument for equality. Media Access Australia is no exception; here are the top five ways the DDA has increased access to media content.

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Campaign for captions in Malta

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A campaign is under way in Malta to have captions introduced on television and in cinemas. Run by the Deaf People Association and film promotion organisation Kinemastic, the Subtitles Now campaign has received international attention.

Currently, the only access provided for Deaf and hearing impaired people on Maltese television is a five minute news update with sign language broadcast each day.  In cinemas, open captioned sessions are few and far between, with most occurring at inconvenient times.


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