DVD terms

Class action launched in the US demanding captioned lyrics

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Nine deaf advocates and individuals have launched a class action against a number of Hollywood Studios, including Disney, Sony, Netflix, Paramount Pictures, Warner Bros and Universal Studios, for failing to caption song lyrics in movies and TV programs.

Cameraman recording a singer live on stage


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Buying DVDs overseas and how access features may be affected

Although it is possible to buy DVDs overseas and watch them on DVD players in Australia, you should be aware that the region coding system for DVDs may affect the playback of captions on DVD players locally. Audio description should not be affected.


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Five highlights of Language and the Media

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The bi-annual Languages and the Media conference is being held in Berlin from 5-7 November. This is the biggest media access conference in the world and Media Access Australia CEO Alex Varley will be presenting at the conference. In this preview, he gives us his five personal highlights of the conference.

Languages & The Media: 10th International Conference on Language Transfer in Audiovisual Media. November 5th - 7th, 2014. Hotel Radisson Blu, Berlin.


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Californian DVD kiosks to be accessible after court settlement

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The DVD supplier Redbox has agreed to makes its kiosks in California accessible for blind and vision impaired consumers after several advocates for the blind launched a class action against the company in 2012.

In settling the class action, Redbox has agreed to incorporate audio guidance, tactile keyboards and other accessibility features into its kiosks. One kiosk at each location will have the features within 18 months, and they will be extended to all of its kiosks within 30 months. There will also be 24-hour phone assistance available at each kiosk.

In addition to this, Redbox will pay US$1.2 million to the class of aggrieved persons in California, and US$10,000 to each of the individuals who made the complaint. It will also pay court costs.


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Is Blu-ray as accessible as DVD?

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In a twist to Media Access Australia’s regular statistics on accessible new release rental DVDs, we have taken a look at titles available over recent months and included the alternative Blu-ray format for comparison to see which format is ahead with accessibility. 

Blu-ray has been an alternative home entertainment video format since 2006 and sold itself on offerings of greater picture quality as well as increased disc space which would allow for more features. This space was promoted by some home entertainment industry representatives as the ‘sure thing’ that would lead to increased levels of closed captioning and audio description.


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DVD distributors accessibility framework

The Australian Home Entertainment Distributors Association (AHEDA) has a DVD accessibility framework document, affirming its commitment to making available access features such as captioning and audio description. 

AHEDA will also respond on behalf of members to complain about accessibility of specific DVD titles where access features were available overseas and not in Australia.

Objectives of the Accessibility Framework for the Home Entertainment Film Industry

The objectives of this Framework are to:


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Statistics on DVD accessibility in Australia

Background

Since 2006, Media Access Australia (MAA) has been keeping a watch on the access levels of entertainment, rental DVDs in Australia on a bi-monthly basis. 

The methods used to provide the information below is simply taken from the DVD covers of rental titles at a local DVD outlet, with support from members of the Australian Home Entertainment Distributors Association (AHEDA).

Within the time that statistics have been kept, over 2,500 titles have been researched.  Titles are checked for a number of things:


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