Practical web accessibility

WCAG 2.0 ‘AAA’ – Is it worth it?

The adoption of the W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 standards has been a great success, with many governments around the world either implementing or committing to implement them over the coming years. 

While most agree in principle that WCAG 2.0 should be implemented, there is considerable debate about the level to which the guidelines should be implemented. Generally the debate is between the minimal ‘A’ standard or the more comprehensive ‘AA’.

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WAI-ARIA: the specifics

In last month’s column, I provided an overview on WAI-ARIA, and how it provides developers with the ability to communicate more effectively with the assistive technology that people with disabilities use to view online information. This month we’ll look at what WAI-ARIA can do to address accessibility issues.

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Introduction to WAI-ARIA: it’s accessibility, but not as we know it

As the W3C makes its last call for input on the WAI-ARIA working draft, people often ask why WAI-ARIA was created, how it relates to WCAG 2.0 and why it’s so important. This post will look at the history of WAI-AIRA, and why it can make such a big difference to the accessibility of the Internet. 

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HTML5 media player accessibility: the potential and the reality

In last month's W3C update I outlined some of the benefits of HTML5 that the W3C believes will have a significant impact on how people will use the web. As multitouch, tablet and portable multimedia devices become more popular the promise of drag-and-drop functionality and standardised video could have a great impact on our productivity and entertainment needs.

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