Deaf/hearing impaired Education news

Computer literacy boosted in South African schools

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Phone manufacturer Huawei has partnered with the Khulisani Foundation to launch a training program in South Africa to increase computer skills amongst disadvantaged children with disability.

The mobile Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Training Centre will travel between special needs schools in disadvantaged areas. The centre will focus on the basics of using a computer, including Microsoft Office, and the web. The training is designed to help children with disability from underprivileged backgrounds escape poverty and gain employment later in life.

The project is in keeping with the South African Government’s plan to help people with disability integrate into mainstream society.


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Disability: the untold story of the NBN

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We sat down with Graeme Innes, Disability Discrimination Commissioner and National Broadband Network Champion, to talk about how high-speed internet can benefit people with disability. Interview by Eliza Cussen.

GI: I’m one of a group of champions in a whole range of areas as to how the NBN is relevant to Australian society. I wasn’t in the original group and I kept going back to the minister, Stephen Conroy, and saying “Look, disability is the untold story of the NBN. I think you should have someone telling these stories.” He came back to me and said, “That’s great, will you do it?”


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Captions in the classroom: a hidden literacy tool

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Education manager and Itinerant Teacher of the Deaf, Anne McGrath, talks through key pieces of research which identify the link between captions and literacy.

Videos and multimedia are being used more and more in the classroom – a trend the new Australian curriculum certainly encourages. Using video not only allows for variety and engagement, but for a real benefit for students’ literacy: captions. Similar to foreign language subtitles, captions are the text version of audio, including speech, sounds and music.

Captions are essential for students who are Deaf or hearing impaired and also have immense benefits for students learning an additional language, struggling readers, and visual learners.


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Educational app review: captions for learning

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Educational apps are increasingly being used by teachers as a fun and interactive way of engaging students, but captions are often lacking on the video content found within them.

Studies have shown that using captions can enhance the learning experience for all students, with particular benefit to students who speak English as a second language or with learning difficulties, not to mention the Deaf or hearing impaired students for whom captions are absolutely essential.

Media Access Australia found and tested three educational apps that include captions for all students.

Brainpop

Cost: Free, $1.99 per month, $6.99 per month (unlimited access)

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The top 12 media access stories of 2012

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The past year has been a big one for people with a disability when it comes to accessing media. Here is our list of the top 12 developments across TV, online video, social media, web accessibility, cinema and education. 

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