Deaf/hearing impaired Education news

The top 12 media access stories of 2012

no
Show on home page

The past year has been a big one for people with a disability when it comes to accessing media. Here is our list of the top 12 developments across TV, online video, social media, web accessibility, cinema and education. 

Taxonomy: 

Top of page

Top 12 of 2012 #11 – the ABC helps get captions in schools

no
Show on home page

In partnership with Education Services Australia, the ABC launched an education website in November. With closed captions provided for all videos, ABC Splash has drastically increased the availability of captioned resources for students.

Captions are not only essential for children who are Deaf or hearing impaired but have been demonstrated to improve literacy outcomes across the board. Captions are particularly valuable for students who speak English as an additional language, struggle with reading or are visual learners. Our education campaign, CAP THAT!,encourages teachers to turn on captions whenever they press play in the classroom.


Top of page

Top 12 of 12 #8 – the captioning grant

no
Show on home page

The captioning grant, funded by the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs and administered by Media Access Australia, has seen many hundreds of hours of videos captioned since it began in the 1990s. 2012 has been another big year for the grant, with over 170 hours of video captioned for 16 organisations.

When the grant began, it was used to fund the captioning of entertainment videos, but it has evolved over the years and is now used to caption DVDs and online videos with an education or community focus. One of the biggest beneficiaries of the grant this year was Education Services Australia, which provides online videos that can be accessed by schools and used as curriculum material. This was mostly in the form of short film clips, including newsreels and other historical material from the National Film and Sound Archive.


Top of page

Top 12 of 2012 #5 - teachers championing captions for all students

no
Show on home page

Our annual CAP THAT! campaign asking teachers nationwide to turn on captions for literacy and inclusion for all students this year recruited almost 400 teachers committed to using captions in their schools.

By turning on captions by default on audiovisual resources used in the classroom, teachers can boost literacy for all their students, particularly those with learning disabilities or with a language background other than English, and ensure that their Deaf or hearing impaired students – often too embarrassed to request captions – are included in the learning process.


Top of page

ABC launches new education site with captioned videos

no
Show on home page

The ABC has partnered with Education Services Australia in launching Splash, a new educational website offering a range of multimedia resources including captioned content.

Splash provides free articles, videos, audio clips and games linked to the new Australian Curriculum. The extensive online library covers maths, English, history and science for primary and secondary students up to Year 10, with other subjects to be added in future.

The site also gives teachers topic collections and ideas for incorporating Splash content into the classroom, as well as useful tips for parents.


Top of page

Accessible cinema a way to learn for British schools

no
Show on home page

The world’s largest free cinema festival for young people is being held in the UK this October. In its 17th year, National Schools Film Week will host more events with services for students with hearing and vision loss than ever before. This reflects the cinema industry’s expansion of captioned and audio described sessions worldwide through the conversion to digital cinema.

Derek Brandon, founder of the UK’s Your Local Cinema website said, “'Each year in the UK around 800 children are born with significant hearing loss, and every day another 100 people start to lose their sight. Thanks to the inclusion of hundreds of subtitled and audio described shows, National Schools Film Week 2012 will enable hundreds of children with hearing or sight loss to enjoy the cinema experience with their classmates.”


Top of page

The literacy tool making a difference in Australian schools

no
Show on home page

NSW Senator the Hon Ursula Stephens has called on all Australian teachers to become Captions Champions during National Literacy and Numeracy Week (27 August – 2 September) to boost literacy and inclusion for all students.

As Patron for our CAP THAT! campaign, proudly sponsored by Australian Communication Exchange, Senator Stephens today launched the national awareness campaign promoting captions as a literacy tool for all students at St Clare of Assisi Primary School in Conder, ACT.


Top of page

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Deaf/hearing impaired Education news