Amazon Kindle 3

VoiceView improves vision-impaired access on budget-priced Kindles

no
Show on home page

Earlier this week Amazon introduced text-to-voice accessory ‘VoiceView‘ to its more affordable Kindle models, starting with the Kindle Paperwhite (7th gen). Up until now, this feature was only available on the company’s more expensive Kindle Fire tablets.

A girl laying on the grass reading a kindle

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

New Kindle Fire disappoints on accessibility

no

Amazon, the world’s most popular online ebook store, has updated its Kindle ebook readers with the release of four new models. The three cheaper e-ink models retain the accessibility of the previous Kindle, However, the flagship Android-based tablet/ereader hybrid, Kindle Fire, has proven disappointing for people with disabilities.

The Kindle Fire, priced at $US199, is likely to provide strong competition to the iPad due to its similar functionality, compatibility with Amazon’s ebook, music and streaming video services, and its remarkable affordability.  As with many tablet computers, the device can connect to a Wi-Fi point and provide access to a variety of online material through its built-in Web browser, access to a variety of music and allow the storage of ebooks. Its touch screen, a significant step forward from the previous Kindle, is likely to prove popular with consumers who like the iPad-style experience.

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

Google Android and Play Books

Android devices can be used as an eReader by using an app called Play Books, which can be downloaded from Google Play. Books can read aloud eBooks that are downloaded or purchased. The app also read ePub books stored on the device.

The accessibility features for Play Books include:

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page
Subscribe to RSS - Amazon Kindle 3