Video

US senator introduces legislation for accessible entertainment

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The impact of access legislation in the USA has had a ripple effect around the world. The 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act, introduced in 2010, has seen a flood of captioned video reach the web. Now two bills being put forward by an Iowan senator could see progress in cinema and in-flight entertainment.

Senator Tom Harkin, who was responsible for introducing the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in 1989, has introduced the Captioning and Image Narration to Enhance Movie Accessibility (CINEMA) Act to amend Title III of the current ADA. The CINEMA Act will require cinema complexes with two or more screens to offer captioning and audio description for all movies at all sessions.


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Why aren’t all DVDs captioned?

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From VHS to video on demand, the way we watch movies is rapidly evolving. Our project manager for DVD, Ally Woodford, explores the key trends impacting on the medium and how the needs of Deaf and hearing impaired viewers can be met now and well into the future.

Recently, popular British blog, i heart subtitles, had a post on the process of producing accessible DVDs and the ongoing issues around the format. Its author, Dawn Jones, addresses some of the issues blocking the road to 100 per cent of DVDs being captioned in the UK.

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Human Rights Commission releases Australia’s first fully-accessible DVD

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Twenty Years: Twenty Stories is a video project initiated by the Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) which celebrates the twentieth anniversary of the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (DDA). The DVD release, as well as having captioning and audio description, will also feature spoken menus – an Australian first. 

Each of the twenty videos, which were produced in association with the Sydney Community Foundation, tells the story of a disabled person who managed to bring about systemic change by making a DDA complaint. The videos, created by both professional filmmakers and community groups, were made possible by donations from government and commercial enterprises. Captioning of the videos was funded by the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs’ Captioning Grant, which is administered by Media Access Australia.


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