Online Media

Accessibility Summit brings accessibility experts live to a computer near you

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The second annual Accessibility Summit conference will be held on 27 September, streaming leading web accessibility experts online to attendees around the world.

Held from 9.00 am to 5.00 pm US central time, the conference will be streamed live with time for asking questions directly to the speaker. Attendees can also chat with other attendees.

Sessions include:


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Leading online video provider Netflix sued for not captioning videos

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The National Association of the Deaf (NAD) is suing Netflix, the largest provider of on-demand video in the US, for failing to provide captions on most of its titles.

With over 23 million members in the US and Canada, Netflix, Inc. is the world's leading internet subscription service provider for films and TV shows. Yet, despite repeated requests from the NAD since 2009, only about 5% of Netflix’s streaming titles are captioned, with the company blaming the delay on technical difficulties.

“For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, captions are like ramps for people with wheelchairs,” said the association’s lawyer, Arlene Mayerson. 


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ACCAN funds Media Access Australia’s social media accessibility project

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The Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN) today announced that Media Access Australia’s social media accessibility project will be among six to receive funding under the ACCAN Grants Scheme for 2011.

The Media Access Australia project will provide practical resources for people with disabilities on how to overcome accessibility issues with social media and effectively use social media for a variety of purposes.

Media Access Australia CEO Alex Varley said, "This project is much needed. Everybody wants to engage in social media and this is especially important for people with disabilities, some of whom are restricted in social opportunities."


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US non-profit group sues CNN.com for uncaptioned online video

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A Berkeley-based non-profit group has filed a lawsuit against Time Warner for allegedly discriminating against the Deaf and hearing impaired by not providing captioned online videos on CNN.com.

CNN.com provides video-on-demand news content to millions of people via their website. The lack of captions means that those who are Deaf or hearing impaired are denied access to this service, instead being forced to wait for news to be aired via traditional television broadcast.

The Disability Rights Advocates who are representing the Greater Los Angeles Agency on Deafness and three individual plaintiffs are calling the lawsuit the first of its kind.


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