Practical Web Accessibility news

YouTube now lets you correct automatic captions

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An intern has developed a way of editing captions within YouTube, drastically increasing the quality of auto-generated captions across the video sharing service.

To provide captions on their YouTube videos, users can either upload their own caption files or use the 'machine transcript' function to generate automatic captions through Google’s voice recognition technology.  These are automatically generated with time codes and appear as captions on the videos once they are turned on. However, the auto-generated captions are renowned for their inaccuracy.

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Introducing Access iQ: helping create a web without limits

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Access iQ is Media Access Australia's new initiative. Launched today, the website is a hub for anyone who wants to learn how to make websites and applications accessible to users of all abilities. Disability Discrimination Commissioner Graeme Innes joined Media Access Australia CEO Alex Varley in unveiling the project in front of media, industry leaders and disability advocates.

The Access iQ website provides resources aimed at equipping web professionals with knowledge to build websites which meet international accessibility guidelines. These resources are written by Access iQ’s own accessibility experts and a number of external contributors at the top of the development, design and usability fields.


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Web accessibility course brings skills to industry and government

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Registrations are now open for our six-week online web accessibility course, Australia's only tertiary-backed accessibility course for web professionals.

The Professional Certificate in Web Accessibility is a joint venture between Media Access Australia and the University of South Australia, and seeks to help educate web professionals in industry and government on how to include people with disabilities in their web design and development.

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Court upholds ruling against Canadian government’s website

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The Canadian government has lost its appeal against a court ruling that said its website was in breach of charter rights of people with vision disabilities.

The Federal Court of Appeal last week upheld a court decision in 2010 that said the Canadian government failed to comply with website accessibility standards when Donna Jodhan, a blind woman from Toronto, could not apply for a job through a government website or complete the 2006 census online.     


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