The arts

Accessible movies at the Melbourne International Film Festival

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The annual Melbourne International Film Festival (MIFF) will host four audio described and open captioned movies this year. The four feature-length movies will play at Hoyts Melbourne Central over the weekend of 9-11 August and patrons are invited to reserve tickets now.

Three of the movies - Galore, Patrick and These Final Hours - will be world premieres during their accessible sessions. The fourth movie is the theatrical take on Tim Winton’s award-winning short story series The Turning, which premieres earlier in the week. All movies are Australian and further information on each can be found on the MIFF website.


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Celebrities audio describe London

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UK audio description specialist Vocal Eyes has completed an inspiring series titled London Beyond Sight, securing the voice talents of 40 famous Londoners to describe significant landmarks and buildings. The project originated from a similar idea in New York.

Executive Director of Vocal Eyes, Judy Dixey, explained in The Guardian that the celebrities were given assistance from audio description professionals, including research about the landmarks and writing the scripts.


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Audio description at the Adelaide Fringe

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The parade of the Adelaide Fringe will be audio described, bringing access to the opening night festivities for people who are blind or vision impaired for the first time. The parade will see King William Street transformed into the world’s largest dance floor with DJ Trip and thousands of street performers getting the city’s biggest party started.

Audio description (AD), which conveys the visual elements of the event, will be broadcast live on Radio Adelaide 101.5. The AD is being provided by Access2Arts, a newly established Adelaide-based company which specialises in audio description of live events.

Gaelle Mellis from Access2Arts said, "It is hugely exciting that the Adelaide Fringe is audio describing its iconic Fringe Parade. This opens up a highly visual event to many people who are often denied these experiences, and is demonstrating that arts and cultural events can be more accessible.”  


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National audio description survey for cultural venues

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Australia’s galleries, museums and theatres are being called on to participate in a national survey of how audio description (AD) is used to bring access to cultural venues for people who are blind or vision impaired.

The Arts Access Australia survey is aimed at all arts and cultural venues regardless of whether they currently offer audio description. Taking between five and ten minutes to complete, the survey will gauge the level of audio description offered compared to other access services venues are providing.


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