Research & policy

British conference celebrates audio description

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The RNIB Audio Description Conference: Celebrating Progress and Looking Ahead, which was held in London on 23 September, brought together a host of audio describers, broadcasters, film distributors, academics and other professionals who were keen to discuss ways of improving and expanding this essential service for people who are blind or vision impaired.

RNIB: supporting blind and partially sighted people

The conference included sessions on the last decade of audio description on television and in cinemas in the UK, and the challenges facing the service over the next ten years. It was coordinated by RNIB (the Royal National Institute of Blind People), and sponsored by BTI Studios, Deluxe and ITV.

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Digital Inclusion Index measures access in Australia

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A new Melbourne-based research project has launched with the aim of discovering the reach of digital inclusion in Australia.

Computer cable extending out from Australia on a world globe

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Accessible India Campaign to greatly improve access to media

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The Accessible India Campaign is set to launch on December 3, the International Day of Persons with Disabilities, with a strong focus on improving access to information and communication technology in the region.

Accessible India Campaign. Accessible India - Empowered India. Department of Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities, Ministry of Social Justice & Empowerment


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Japan trials live captioning system

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Kyoto University in Japan is trailing a new live captioning system for use in academic conferences, using an automatic speech recognition system to cut down on the amount of human input needed to deliver live captions.

Camphor tree in front of the Clock Tower at Kyoto University

The drive for this is the new accessibility laws scheduled for 2016 which mandates reasonable accommodation provisions to people with disabilities. In a university and conference setting this means that the amount of captioning will need to increase.


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New research looks at caption speed

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A long-standing issue for caption watchers and producers is how fast should captions be? Some people have problems reading the captions if they display too quickly and others complain if captions are edited from the full speech so that there is enough time to read them.

Right hand holding a remote control in front of a TV with captions displayed

New research into caption speed by the BBC aimed to try and answer the question or see if it is really that important?


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The future of live captioning

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Will machines take over the captioning world and automatically provide perfect captions on live programs, events, meetings and the classroom? Or are future changes going to be more subtle than that?

Woman using a virtual reality headset


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ACMA to host a conversation on live captioning

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The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) is holding a one-day event on 15 September, Live captioning: let’s talk, that will provide an opportunity for representatives from industry, government and consumers to discuss the state and future of live captioning.

Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) logo


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A world of access at Media for All

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Access to media is a growing feature at international conferences. A problem for Australian audiences is that these conferences are usually located in Europe or North America and tend to feature experts and case studies only from those regions of the world.

Sphere comprised of multiple images with light emerging from its centre


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Making access work in the New World

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Access to media through audio description and captioning is well established through most of Europe, North America and the English-speaking world. However, the situation in other parts of the globe is very mixed. Reporting in Australia is, not suprisingly, biased towards English language developments and advances. What is happening in other parts of the world, especially in Asia?

Globe of the world with Asia in focus

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