Cinema

Event Cinemas add seven accessible locations

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Event Cinemas commences captioned and audio described movie sessions at seven new locations from today, bringing the national total of accessible cinemas to 55.

Captioned movies allow people who are Deaf or hearing impaired to watch movies through a personal viewing screen that sits in the seat’s cup holder. Audio description, for the blind or vision impaired, is delivered via a personal receiver and either ear buds or over-the-head earphones.


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Exhibition celebrating blindness comes to the Melbourne Museum

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An exhibition that celebrates people living with blindness or low vision and their achievements is now on show at the Melbourne Museum. According to the museum website, the exhibition “shows how Australians with blindness or low vision participate in every aspect of community life - thanks to developments in education and training, technology, legislation and social change over the past 140 years”.

Supported by Vision Australia, Living in a Sensory World: Stories of People with Blindness and Low Vision gives visitors an understanding of the blindness and low vision community through personal stories, objects from Vision Australia’s heritage collection and examples of new technologies that are increasing the independence of thousands of Australians.


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Transcript: accessible movie events

22 July 2012

Roberta: Melbourne accessible movie fans will be pleased to hear there are a number of events coming up that will showcase audio described and captioned movies. To tell us about the events, Media Access Australia Cinema and DVD Project Manager, Ally Woodford, is with us today. Hello, Ally.

Ally: Hi Roberta, hi everyone.

Roberta: I believe there are three events to talk about today, so what’s the first one?

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Questionnaire on audio described cinema

1 July 2012

Roberta: Accessible Cinema, defined as movies in cinemas that are shown with audio description and/or captions, have experienced both a radical change in the way the technology is presented and a major increase in the number of screens that show them. This is a big step forward but there are still some technical bugs that need to be sorted out. Ally Woodford from Media Access Australia is here to tell us how you can help pinpoint what the issues are via their new questionnaire. Welcome Ally.

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