TV terms

The New Zealand Captioning Awards

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Individuals and organisations which have contributed to the advancement of captioning will be honoured at the New Zealand Captioning Awards, to be held in Auckland on 27 November.

Deaf Aotearoa New Zealand, National Foundation for the Deaf and Hearing Association New Zealand: The Captioning Working Group


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Video on demand services still lack captions

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A recent article on the VOD Professional website highlights that fact that most video on demand (VOD) services in the UK still lack closed captions.

Young boy watching TV


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Dedicated television channel for primary school children with captions

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A partnership between Ai-Media and Discovery Kids will culminate in the launching of Australia’s only television channel dedicated to primary school education with 100% captioned content, on Foxtel on 3 November.

Kari Byron standing next to Discovery Kids logo


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Repealing captioning red tape: Captioning of repeats on multichannels

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In the fifth part of our series on red tape repeal, we look at the digital multichannels, which are currently exempt from the normal caption quotas but are required to caption previous repeats.

Scissors cutting through a red ribbon


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Repealing captioning red tape: Caption quotas

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In the fourth part of our series on red tape repeal, we look at the confusing state of caption quotas for Australian TV, and how they can be simplified to benefit consumers and broadcasters.

Man's right hand holding open scissors over a line of red tape


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Repealing captioning red tape: Caption reporting

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In the third part of our series on red tape repeal, we look at calls to end the requirement that broadcasters must report on how much captioning they have done.

Scissors cutting through red tape


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Repealing captioning red tape: Caption quotas on subscription TV

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In the second part of our series on red tape repeal, we look at the issue of caption quotas on subscription television, and the importance for consumers of knowing in advance how much will be captioned on individual channels.

Open scissors cutting through red tape


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Trial of audio description on ABC iview to start in 2015

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The Minister of Communications, Malcolm Turnbull, has advised Media Access Australia that a trial of audio description will commence on the ABC’s catch-up TV service, iview, in April 2015.

The service will initially be available on iPhones, then expand to other platforms including Android, via PCs and Hybrid Broadcast Broadband TV (HbbTV) by August 2015. (HbbTV is the platform that will host the Freeview Plus service, due to be launched on 2 September.)

The trial will last for 15 months, and provide at least 14 hours of audio described content per week, with a mix of drama/entertainment, documentary/current affairs and children’s programming. Currently, the only catch-up TV service in the world to provide audio description is the BBC’s iPlayer.


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ACMA finds Nine cricket coverage breached caption quality rules

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The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has found that segments of Channel Nine Cricket broadcast in January 2014 breached its caption quality standard.

The ACMA’s standard, which came into effect in July 2013, states that captions must be readable, accurate and comprehensible. The breaches related to the pre-game segments of programs which went to air on 12 and 17 January.


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Did you know: One Deaf lawyer helped increase access for all Deaf Canadians?

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In 2000, Vancouver lawyer Henry Vlug lodged a complaint against the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) in the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal (CHRT) for not including closed captions on all of its television programs.

Vlug stated he could not enjoy programs such as major league baseball playoff games without the inclusion of captions, arguing that Deaf Canadians are equal to those who can hear since their taxes funded the broadcaster, entitling them to the full experience of CBC programming.

The case was won and the lawyer granted CAD$10,000 by the CHRT for pain and suffering. CBC appealed the tribunal’s settlement but later dropped the bid when it settled with Vlug out of court for a lower amount.


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