Captions

Australian Game Developer Awards set to honour accessibility and representation of people with disabilities

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Nominations are open for the Australian Game Developer Awards (AGDAs) until Friday 2nd October, awarding accessible design and games representing marginalised groups, including people with disabilities.

Man holding a PlayStation 4 controller with both hands

Digital media and technology: 

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Japan trials live captioning system

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Kyoto University in Japan is trailing a new live captioning system for use in academic conferences, using an automatic speech recognition system to cut down on the amount of human input needed to deliver live captions.

Camphor tree in front of the Clock Tower at Kyoto University

The drive for this is the new accessibility laws scheduled for 2016 which mandates reasonable accommodation provisions to people with disabilities. In a university and conference setting this means that the amount of captioning will need to increase.


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New research looks at caption speed

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A long-standing issue for caption watchers and producers is how fast should captions be? Some people have problems reading the captions if they display too quickly and others complain if captions are edited from the full speech so that there is enough time to read them.

Right hand holding a remote control in front of a TV with captions displayed

New research into caption speed by the BBC aimed to try and answer the question or see if it is really that important?


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The future of live captioning

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Will machines take over the captioning world and automatically provide perfect captions on live programs, events, meetings and the classroom? Or are future changes going to be more subtle than that?

Woman using a virtual reality headset


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Britain’s first Captioning Awareness Week

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Stagetext, a charitable organisation that provides captioning for theatrical performances, art galleries, museums and other arts venues, is holding a Captioning Awareness Week from 9 to 15 November 2015.

Live stage performance with a text overlay reading '[#CAPaware] because 10 million people in the UK have hearing loss'. Image credit: Stagetext


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CAP THAT! recap

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In June 2015, we launched our annual CAP THAT! campaign with a simple message: turn the captions on when watching video content in class. This year we focused on the significance of using captions to benefit even more students, including students with English as an Additional Language, those who have reading difficulties, children on the autism spectrum, as well as students who are Deaf or hearing impaired. Amongst Australian schools nationwide, this equates to over one million kids in total.

CAP THAT! captioned for learning logo


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Captions: essential for learning

This downloadable brochure is available for teachers, librarians and teachers of the Deaf to use and share, explaining how captions provide literacy, learning and accessibility benefits for all students. Available information includes:


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Apple TV, iPhone and iPad lineup offers both accessibility benefits and challenges

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The new range of Apple products has been announced with upgrades of many of them including new iPhones, an iPad with a larger screen, and a significant update to the Apple TV. While many of the products include helpful accessibility improvements, users should also be aware of some potential challenges the new features may create.

Apple iPad Pro and iPhone 6S with iOS9 home screen displayed

Digital media and technology: 

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European group looks at the accessibility possibilities of HbbTV

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HbbTV (Hybrid Broadcast Broadband TV) is a digital platform which provides seamless integration of traditional broadcast TV and content delivered over the internet. It also offers opportunities for improving the accessibility of TV, and these are being explored by a European consortium, HBB4ALL.

HBB4ALL: Connected TV accessibility logo


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Several hundred million reasons captions boost literacy

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The use of captions to help with literacy is supported by a range of studies and approaches. As we approach National Literacy and Numeracy Week and the culmination of the CAP THAT! campaign, we contrast two studies on captions and literacy—a small-scale American study and a massive program in India targeting hundreds of millions.

Key attached to keychain with the word 'literacy'


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