Ofcom, Office of Communications

Five live-caption quality issues from the UK

no
Show on home page

The quality of live captioning was a major topic discussed at the recent The Future of Subtitling conference held in London on 10 November 2014. Media Access Australia CEO Alex Varley presented at the conference and he gives his impressions on the main issues from the UK perspective.

Woman using live captioning set-up with microphone, headphones and computer


Top of page

Ofcom releases first access report for 2014

no
Show on home page

The UK communications regulator Ofcom has released its Television Access Report for the first half of 2014, which shows that once again, most British broadcasters are exceeding their access requirements. The report comes as the Federal Government is trying to end similar reporting requirements which are in place for Australian broadcasters.

Girl watching TV


Top of page

Ofcom report highlights live captioning issues

no
Show on home page

The UK communications regulator Ofcom has issued the second of four planned reports on the quality of live captioning. It finds that there have been some improvements since the first report in April, but shows that the delay in captions appearing on screen remains a significant issue for viewers.

Left hand pressing 'up' button on remote control


Top of page

Repealing captioning red tape: Caption reporting

no
Show on home page

In the third part of our series on red tape repeal, we look at calls to end the requirement that broadcasters must report on how much captioning they have done.

Scissors cutting through red tape


Top of page

Caption reports hide great access story

no
Show on home page

Why is it that our communications regulator seems satisfied to hide great achievements in access by our free-to-air television stations? Commentary by Alex Varley.

Developments that benefit viewers, stations, advertisers and content providers should be celebrated and publicised. Instead the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) puts out reports that hide innovation and the power of the market to deliver more under a spirit of healthy competition.


Top of page

Ofcom consults on sign language requirements

no
Show on home page

The UK communications regulator Ofcom has launched a review of the signing arrangements it has in place for TV channels with low audience levels.

In 2007, Ofcom announced that channels with an audience share of between 0.05% and 1% had to show at least 30 minutes of programming a week with British Sign Language. However, two years later, it gave these channels the alternative of spending £20,000 each year in a way that would also increase the level of signed programs on TV. Over 50 channels have taken this option, and contribute this amount annually to the British Sign Language Broadcasting Trust, which funds signed content on the Community Channel and Film 4.


Top of page

Ofcom releases access requirements for 2015

no
Show on home page

The UK communications regulator Ofcom has released its list of TV channels which will be required to provide access services – captioning, audio description and signing – in 2015.

Ofcom conducts an annual mid-year review of access requirements, based on each channel’s revenue and audience share in the previous year. Following this year’s review, 79 domestic channels will be required to provide access services in 2015, compared to 76 in 2014. This accounts for over 90% of the total UK audience share.


Top of page

UK moves to measure live captioning

no
Show on home page

The UK broadcasting regulator Ofcom has announced that it will require television broadcasters to measure the quality of live captioning (known as ‘subtitling’ in the UK).

Live captioning refers to when the captions are created as the program goes to air. These are generally less accurate than captions created ahead of time.

Ofcom’s new approach follows extensive consultation with consumer groups, broadcasters and access suppliers and is part of Ofcom’s effort to comprehensively review the quality of live captioning and identify ways in which it can be improved. The measurement program will start later this year and requires samples to be analysed every six months for a period of two years.


Top of page

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Ofcom, Office of Communications