National Curriculum

Hearing Impairment / Deafness

Audiovisual resources have become integral to the classroom. A high percentage of these materials are used to support the curriculum, yet the access barriers for many students that this presents are not being adequately addressed by all states and systems.


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Online content to support the Australian Curriculum

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Finding online resources that are aligned to the Australian Curriculum is now a whole lot easier. Education Services Australia (ESA) has developed Scootle, a purpose-designed search tool which is available to teachers nationally. Some of the content to be found on Scootle is captioned, and teachers can refine their search to include only captioned material.

The Scootle portal houses an increasing range of content from a variety of educational sources. From an accessibility standpoint, only some of the content is captioned and Scootle has put processes in place to include more captioned educational content in the future.


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Captions in the classroom: a hidden literacy tool

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Education manager and Itinerant Teacher of the Deaf, Anne McGrath, talks through key pieces of research which identify the link between captions and literacy.

Videos and multimedia are being used more and more in the classroom – a trend the new Australian curriculum certainly encourages. Using video not only allows for variety and engagement, but for a real benefit for students’ literacy: captions. Similar to foreign language subtitles, captions are the text version of audio, including speech, sounds and music.

Captions are essential for students who are Deaf or hearing impaired and also have immense benefits for students learning an additional language, struggling readers, and visual learners.


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Top 12 of 2012 #11 – the ABC helps get captions in schools

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In partnership with Education Services Australia, the ABC launched an education website in November. With closed captions provided for all videos, ABC Splash has drastically increased the availability of captioned resources for students.

Captions are not only essential for children who are Deaf or hearing impaired but have been demonstrated to improve literacy outcomes across the board. Captions are particularly valuable for students who speak English as an additional language, struggle with reading or are visual learners. Our education campaign, CAP THAT!,encourages teachers to turn on captions whenever they press play in the classroom.


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ACARA calls for contributions for a more inclusive Australian Curriculum

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In an announcement yesterday, The Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) called for education professionals to contribute to making the Australian Curriculum more inclusive for students with a disability.

Applications to the Australian Curriculum Equity and Diversity Advisory Group are encouraged from people who have expertise in at least one priority equity and diversity area. These areas include students with a disability and students with English as an additional language or dialect.

The group is a welcome opportunity for professionals who have experience working with students with a disability, such as Itinerant Teachers of the Deaf (ITODs), to provide expert input.


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