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W3C updates accessibility guidelines

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The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the global regulatory body for the web, has recently updated a number of their working draft standards. A series of documents within its Web Accessibility Initiative have been progressed, with updates to the Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) 2.0, User Agent Accessibility Guidelines (UAAG) and draft documents released by the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 Evaluation Taskforce (Eval TF).

The ATAG Working Group has published updated Working Drafts of ATAG 2.0 and the companion document Implementing ATAG 2.0 which define how authoring tools can help developers produce accessible web content that conforms to WCAG 2.0. It also defines how to make authoring tools accessible to people with disabilities.

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Commentary: Getty-Google partnership misses the mark on accessibility

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The Getty Museum recently announced that it would be the first museum to collaborate with Google, and using Google’s image recognition application Google Goggles, offer visitors the chance to learn more about the artworks.

Visitors to the Getty Museum can take a photo using Google Goggles on their Android phone or iPhone and immediately access more information about the work of art as well as commentary from artists and curators.


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UK Festival Awards puts more focus on festival accessibility

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The UK Festival Awards is the annual awards for the contemporary music festival industry and the benchmark by which festival goers rate their experiences. Considered a coveted prize for organisers, this year’s awards will include disabled access in the criteria.

Generated by the Attitude is Everything campaign which aims to improve deaf and disabled people’s access to live music events, the judging criteria will be across all categories, but the winner of the Best Grassroots Festival will receive a  £1,000 bursary to go towards access and disability equality training.


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First free practical guide to NVDA screen reader released

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Media Access Australia has released the first free training resource for the NVDA screen reader: a ‘wikispace’ that provides a step-by-step guide to installing and using the free assistive technology.

The NonVisual Desktop Access (NVDA) is a free and open source screen reader for the Microsoft Windows operating system. It communicates the contents of a computer screen via synthetic speech and Braille, enabling people who are blind or vision impaired to perform computer tasks such as searching the internet and writing documents.

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