Digital technology

New device assists vision impaired to understand graphics

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A new prototype tablet device developed by Monash University may soon make accessing diagrams for people who are vision impaired easier.

The tablet, called GraVVITAS uses a standard touch screen tablet PC combined with sound, vibration and voice prompts to help guide the user to read the diagram.

PhD candidate Cagatay Goncu who, along with Professor Kim Marriott is working on GraVVITAS said, “The basic idea is to guide the user to find the object by using sound. Touching the object causes the sound to stop and a voice explains what that object is and any other information associated with it.”

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RNIB video shows impact of eBooks for the blind and vision impaired

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The Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) in the United Kingdom has released a YouTube video that talks about the impact that eBooks and eBook readers have on the lives of people who are blind or vision impaired.

An eBook is an electronic version of a print book that can be read on an eReader, which is a specific device for viewing eBooks, or other portable devices such as tablets and smartphones.

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Customise your news alerts now

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There are many ways you can choose to receive news from Media Access Australia, and with a few easy steps you can customise your subscription by selecting both the type of news you are interested in as well as the frequency you receive it.

Here are a few points about your subscription and how you can personalise your news from Media Access Australia.

If you have already subscribed to the news alerts you must first be issued with a new password for the website.

Once logged into the site you can change your news alert preferences by going into the subscriptions tab and then choosing tags.

You are then presented with choices in both disability and media type:


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New standard helps preserve captions on catch-up TV

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The Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) has made freely available a standard that will enable captions from broadcast TV and broadband video programming to work together – or to interoperate.

The official description for the SMPTE ST 2052-1:2010 standard, called Time Text Format (SMPTE-TT) states:


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