Practical Web Accessibility news

Guest post: Voting independently

no
Show on home page

In a recent state by-election, screen reader user Andrew Devenish-Meares was able to vote online. Here, he talks through the experience of being able to place a secret vote independently.

It’s that time again for the people of the Northern Tablelands state election. Some people view it as a right, others say it is an obligation. Either way, the law requires we cast our ballots in a by-election.

Here in New South Wales, the NSW Electoral Commission has spent considerable time developing an online voting application for use in state elections and by-elections. It’s called iVote, and was first used at the last state election in 2011 to great success.

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

Google petitioned on accessibility

no
Show on home page

Software giant Google has been petitioned by J.P. Shandra, a blind user, to make each of its products usable for people with disability. The petition, posted on global consumer campaigning site Change.org, identifies that Google is failing to keep up with its competitors on accessibility.

While Google has made significant steps to improve the accessibility of some of its applications, including Gmail and Chrome, Shandra says that the company fails to integrate the needs of disabled users into its product development.

Shandra identifies the social network Google+ as an example of a product which has been released to the public with inaccessible buttons and form fields.

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

Presentation: Web For All 2013

no
Show on home page

Dr Scott Hollier and Associate Professor Denise Wood, co-lecturers of the Professional Certificate In Web Accessibility presented at the Web For All (W4A) Conference in Rio de Janeiro last week.

In the presentation, Hollier and Wood discuss how the course, the only one of its kind, enables the Australian government to comply with international web accessibility guidelines.

Their paper highlights the challenges faced by the Australian Government as it progresses towards WCAG 2.0 conformance, and how the course equips government web professionals to meet them.


Top of page

Media Access Australia at the World Wide Web Conference

no
Show on home page

Dr Scott Hollier, our manager of major projects, is presenting a paper at the 22nd International World Wide Web conference in Brazil today. Presented with co-lecturer Associate Professor Denise Wood, the paper looks into how the Professional Certificate in Web Accessibility addresses the shortfall in accessibility knowledge in Australia.

The annual World Wide Web Conference, opened by Tim Berners-Lee, brings together professionals at the forefront of the web. Web For All (W4A) is a stream within the conference which focuses specifically on how web content can be made available to everyone regardless of disability. In its tenth year, W4A will look at how accessibility holds an increasingly prominent place within the future of the web.


Top of page

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Practical Web Accessibility news