iPhone

App review: Remember the Milk

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Our digital technology and online media team have tested the usability of various task management apps for blind and vision impaired users. Due to the inbuilt accessibility features found in iOS devices, only apps available on the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch have been reviewed.

Below is a review of Remember The Milk version 2.0.2. The app has since been updated and users have reported decreased accessibility on the iPhone.

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Braille keyboard for iPhone developed

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Researchers at Georgia Tech have developed BrailleTouch, a prototype iPhone app that allows people who are blind or vision impaired to send text messages using an onscreen Braille keyboard.

Braille is a tactile writing system for people who are blind or vision impaired. A Braille keyboard allows users to enter Braille characters by pressing several keys together, like playing a chord on a piano. There are six keys on a Braille keyboard, each of which equate to one of the six dots that make up a Braille character.

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New iPhone release: a summary of accessibility improvements

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Apple CEO Tim Cook announced iPhone 4S today – but what impact does the announcement have on accessibility for people with disabilities?

The new iPhone 4S is essentially a hardware upgrade. It is more powerful and includes a better camera for increased image and video quality. Most of the accessibility features for iPhone come from the mobile operating system iOS rather than the device itself. However, there were a number of announcements today that impact on the accessibility world.

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Siri adds another dimension to iPhone accessibility

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Apple has released a new version of iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, with enhanced accessibility features. Perhaps the most important is a new voice recognition program, allowing users to perform a wide variety of tasks hands and eyes free.

Marketed as a personal assistant in your phone, Siri responds to vocal commands such as questions with information. For instance, the question “what’s the weather like in San Francisco today?” will trigger the phone to respond audibly with weather information. The Apple website states that “It does what you say and finds the information you need. And then it hits you. You’re actually having a conversation with your iPhone.”

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