Assistive technology

American Foundation of the Blind launches note-taking app

no
Show on home page

A specialised iPhone and iPad app called AccessNote has been launched by the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB), enabling blind and vision impaired users around the world to write notes on their phones. With a host of accessibility features including compatibility with braille displays and keyboard navigation, AccessNote is an affordable alternative to traditional note-taking devices.

The AccessNote is the first note-taking app specifically designed for blind and vision impaired users, and thus includes VoiceOver support, and adjustable colour contrast and text size.

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

Older people with sight loss excluded online

no
Show on home page

Research conducted by the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) and BT Group in the UK has highlighted the impact of older people being excluded online.

The study, Tackling Digital Exclusion,found that 87 per cent of older people who are blind or partially sighted have never used the internet.  Researchers attribute this to a perception amongst this group that blindness or low vision makes using computers and websites impossible.

Digital media and technology: 

Top of page

Introducing Glassbrick, Australia’s home-grown screen magnifier

no
Show on home page

Have you ever used a piece of technology and thought “I could make a better one of these”? Sierra Asher, a 27-year-old game designer from Brisbane, did just that. The end product is Glassbrick, a screen magnifier for Windows that can meet the demands of hardcore gamers.

Asher works for game design house Halfbrick Studios and is the sole artist behind the hugely popular Jetpack Joyride. He has impaired vision and is reliant on screen magnification software to use computers. A Mac user at home, Asher couldn’t find a screen magnifier for PCs that was up to the task.

""


Top of page

Assistive Android apps recognised

no
Show on home page

The Vodafone Foundation Smart Accessibility Awards were held yesterday in Belgium to celebrate innovative apps for Android smartphones designed to make things easier for people with a disability.

Funded by the Vodafone Foundation and supported by the European Disability Forum, the awards recognised apps in four categories: Wellbeing, Independent Living, Social Participation and Mobility. As phones which run on Android are generally less accessible than the Apple iPhone, encouraging Android developers to consider the needs of disabled users is very worthwhile.

Below are the winners and runners-up in each category:


Top of page

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Assistive technology