WCAG

Web accessibility vital to elections

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Media Access Australia’s resident web accessibility expert, Dr Scott Hollier, has warned that a lack of accessible websites could lead to voters with disabilities potentially miscasting their votes at the next federal or state election.

Speaking ahead of his presentation on disability and digital divides, to be given at the Australian and New Zealand Communication Association (ANZCA) conference in Melbourne, Dr Hollier said that a lack of web accessibility could have profound effects on society.

“If you look at the last federal election as a case study, a voter with a disability would have had a very difficult time in gaining information to guide their votes based on the lack of accessibility of the websites of the major parties,” he said.

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Round-up of the M-Enabling Australasia 2013 Conference

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Experts in mobile technology, accessibility, industry representatives, government and disability and consumer advocacy groups last week came together to discuss challenges and trends in mobile technology and accessibility at the M-Enabling Australasia 2013 Conference. Held at the Australian Technology Park in Sydney, the conference was organised by the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN) in joint partnership with Telstra.

International speakers including Karen Peltz Strauss, Deputy Bureau Chief of the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the US, and President and Executive Director of The Global Initiative for Inclusive ICT (G3ict) Axel Leblois, discussed how accessibility is currently driving innovation in legislation and mobile technology.

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WCAG 2.0 under fire in new research

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Controversial research has been published damning the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 as system for achieving equal access to the web for disabled users.

WCAG 2.0 is an internationally used set of criteria aimed at helping web professionals create content which is usable for everyone regardless of disability. WCAG 2.0 is being implemented by Australian federal and state and territory governments under the National Transition Strategy.

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Web accessibility certificate: 2013 registrations open

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Media Access Australia, in partnership with the University of South Australia, has launched its Professional Certificate in Web Accessibility for 2013, an online qualification for professionals wanting to make their web content accessible to people with a disability.

The six-week online course, now in its second year, gives technical web professionals a practical understanding of the principles and techniques needed to reach compliance with international standards, the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0.

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