Legal

New Zealand holds an inquiry into captioning

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New Zealand’s Government Administration Committee has announced an inquiry into captioning, and is seeking submissions from the public.

Remote control being pointed at a TV with captions at the bottom of the screen

The inquiry’s terms of reference include:


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Public Sector web and mobile app accessibility to become law in Europe

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Last week, three years since its proposal, it was agreed that public sector web accessibility will now become a legal requirement in Europe; an improvement that will make a huge impact on the community.

A mouse curser hovering over a URL search bar on a webpage


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NSW set for web accessible 2015 election

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The forthcoming NSW election is looking to be one of Australia’s more accessible state elections thanks to the remote electronic voting system, iVote.

iVote logo

The iVote system was introduced for the NSW State General Election in March 2011, initially to enable people who are blind or have low vision to cast an independent vote.


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Coles web accessibility case settled

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The case against grocery retailer Coles, for the alleged inaccessibility of its online shopping service, has been settled.

Miniature shopping cart resting on a laptop keyboard. Image credit:  Tim Reckmann, Flickr

Digital media and technology: 

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Deadline for submissions to caption review arrives

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Today is the deadline for submissions to the Senate Communications and Environment Committee which is reviewing proposed changes to captioning regulations.

Number 10 circled on calendar with the word 'Deadline' written below; right hand holding pen underneath


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Online grocer Peapod settles web accessibility action

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Online shoppers with disabilities have achieved a win with the news overnight that the US Justice Department has settled a discrimination action against internet supermarket, Peapod.

Computer mouse finger cursor over a shopping basket

Digital media and technology: 

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Did you know: One Deaf lawyer helped increase access for all Deaf Canadians?

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In 2000, Vancouver lawyer Henry Vlug lodged a complaint against the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) in the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal (CHRT) for not including closed captions on all of its television programs.

Vlug stated he could not enjoy programs such as major league baseball playoff games without the inclusion of captions, arguing that Deaf Canadians are equal to those who can hear since their taxes funded the broadcaster, entitling them to the full experience of CBC programming.

The case was won and the lawyer granted CAD$10,000 by the CHRT for pain and suffering. CBC appealed the tribunal’s settlement but later dropped the bid when it settled with Vlug out of court for a lower amount.


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Disney being sued over lack of accessibility

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Three women in the United States are suing Disney for discrimination against those who are blind or vision impaired.

According to the press release about the class action suit, the plaintiffs are claiming that the parks themselves are discriminatory against people who are blind and vision impaired by “refusing to reasonably accommodate the needs of guests with guide dogs, refusing to provide functional audio technology, refusing to provide Braille menus, schedules and maps, and more”.


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